Cookies on Pinsent Masons website

This website uses cookies to allow us to see how the site is used. The cookies cannot identify you. If you continue to use this site we will assume that you are happy with this

If you want to use the sites without cookies or would like to know more, you can do that here.

Brazilian newspapers withdraw from Google News

Members of the National Association of Newspapers in Brazil (ANJ) have decided to stop Google from displaying snippets of their content on the internet giant's 'News' service.22 Oct 2012

ANJ, which represents publishers making up approximately 90% of the newspaper circulation market in Brazil, said that the appearance of its members' content on Google News was a hindrance to their plans to grow their online presence, according to a report by the Knight Center for Journalism in the Americas.

"Google News benefits commercially from that quality content and is unwilling to discuss a remuneration model for the production of these materials," ANJ president Carlos Fernando Lindenberg Neto said, according to the Knight Center report. "Staying in Google News was not helping us grow our digital audiences. On the contrary, by providing the first few lines of our stories to internet users, the service reduces the chances that they will look at the entire story in our web sites."

Lindenberg said that the potential loss of traffic to newspaper websites generated by Google News was "an acceptable price [to pay] to protect our content and brands". He said Google News' "presence" in Brazil was "small," according to the Knight Center report.

However, Google has claimed that its News service helps to direct a billion 'clicks' to news websites around the world, the report said.

Google has recently outlined its opposition to plans in France that would force search engines to pay in order to display links to publishers' content in its search engine rankings. Similar plans are being developed in Germany. Google has threatened to stop displaying links to French publishers' content if the Government in France introduces such a law.

In May 2011 a court in Belgium ruled that Google had infringed copyright in newspaper reports when it linked to the papers' websites or copied sections of stories on its Google News service. The ruling backed an earlier judgment by the Court of First Instance in Belgium.

Copiepresse, an agency acting for newspapers, sued Google on behalf of the papers in 2006. The newspapers argued that they were losing online subscriptions and advertising revenue because Google was posting free snippets of the stories and links to the full article on Google News.

However, as well as stopping the Google News snippets the internet giant also stopped displaying links to the newspaper websites via its search engine results. It returned the links to search engine results only after Copiepresse gave it permission to "re-include" the sites in the indexes. Google had said it would be happy to include the Belgian newspaper websites in its search results if they would waive the potential penalties a court could issue.

The newspapers had complained that Google had been "unnecessarily aggressive" in removing them from the search engine.

Join My Out-Law

  • See only the content that matters to you
  • Tailor Out-Law to your exact needs
  • Save the most useful content for later reading
  • Tailor our weekly eNewsletter to your interests

Join My Out-Law

Already signed up to My Out-Law? Sign in

Expertise in Copyright

Copyright is an extremely valuable, often unrecognised or misunderstood right which protects a whole range of original materials including written materials, software, artistic materials, music and dramatic works. It arises automatically without the need for registration in most countries and protects these materials from unauthorised copying. It is essential in business to identify such rights, ensure they are owned by the correct entity, properly protected, enforced and exploited.

More about Copyright